Soldiers adapt to succeed. So does GX.

Today, as the mission of the Guard adapts to changing global needs, so does GX. Our stories help Guard Soldiers stay ready for any mission—whether it’s deploying around the world, countering threats from cyberspace or responding to natural or man-made disasters at home. 

And GX never backs down from covering the tough issues. After all, the magazine was born in a time of war. Helping Soldiers and their families cope with and find resources for many of life’s challenges—like unemployment, family separations and PTSD—is a GX cornerstone commitment.

There are other ways GX is keeping up with a changing world. What started as a print magazine is now available on laptops, phones and tablets as well. GXonline.com provides a great home for some remarkable video journalism. And social media give us another way to reach out to Soldiers and their families.

The GX team is always looking for new ways to inspire and empower the men and women of the National Guard. As advancements in photographic, video and digital technology
come along, we’ll put them to work shaping the future of GX. But even as GX has evolved over the years, its mission remains the same—to celebrate and support the Soldiers and families of the National Guard.

 
In addition to industry awards, iostudio is a recipient of the Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award—the highest military honor given to civilian employers. GX has also received recognition from three U.S. presidents for our ongoing support of National Guard Soldiers and families.

In addition to industry awards, iostudio is a recipient of the Secretary of Defense Employer Support Freedom Award—the highest military honor given to civilian employers. GX has also received recognition from three U.S. presidents for our ongoing support of National Guard Soldiers and families.

“This morning at our routine update briefing [in Africa], which goes out to a room of people from every branch of the military, I mentioned that we submitted [your] materials. I usually get no crowd response about what we’re doing, even if its BBC or Reuters. So I say GX, and about five people in the room get really excited. Our Navy admiral who was taking the briefing goes, ‘Is GX a big deal?’ And every Guard member starts nodding their head. Then the admiral gets very excited. So, in other words, you have a reputation, even on the other side of the world.”

Former public affairs officer, District of Columbia National Guard